Another PowerAmerica Member takes bold steps into the future world of Power Electronics

Another PowerAmerica Member takes bold steps into the future world of Power Electronics. Cree, a leader in silicon carbide (SiC) power products and gallium nitride (GaN) radio frequency (RF) devices, announced that Wolfspeed is the new name for the Power and RF division of Cree. The company announced it would separate the business into a standalone company.
Founded upon the mission to liberate power and wireless systems from the limitations of silicon, Wolfspeed enters the marketplace as a well-established, entrepreneurial growth company with a focused team, a profitable business and more than 28 years of industry-leading wide bandgap semiconductor technology and experience.
The new name combines important elements of Cree’s culture and expertise and allows the Power and RF division to build brand equity while operating as a separate business. As a Cree Company, Wolfspeed will leverage Cree’s industry-leading brand, global footprint, scale and expertise to ensure a smooth transition for customers.
Wolfspeed is providing a first look at the new company’s name, brand identity and purpose in advance of an IPO, which is planned to execute during fiscal year 2016,” said Frank Plastina, chief executive officer, Wolfspeed. “We’re building something new on the firm foundation that is Cree,” Plastina added, “and we want to share our vision, plans and enthusiasm with all of our stakeholders as we move seamlessly through the transition.”
As the only player in the industry with a fully commercialized, broad portfolio of the most field-tested SiC and GaN power and wireless technologies and products on the market, Wolfspeed™ will power its customers’ innovations, enabling higher power density, higher switching frequencies and reduced system size and weight. These advantages lead to smaller systems, lower system costs and improved performance, and will ultimately lead to more powerful applications in the transportation, industrial and electronics, energy, and communications markets, helping Wolfspeed achieve its vision of becoming the world’s leading wide bandgap semiconductor electronics company.

Dr. Baliga Wins 2015 Global Energy Prize

NC State Professor & PowerAmerica Principle Investigator Jay Baliga, lauded by Scientific American as one of the heroes of the semiconductor revolution, scored another scientific honor this year. The professor was awakened at 4:30 in the morning on April 23with news from Moscow that he is a 2015 winner of the Global Energy Prize, an annual award presented at the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum in June. Dr. Baliga continues his world-changing research with PowerAmerica to accelerate the deployment of the next generation of power electronics across our economy using a traditional silicon foundry.

Repurposing Silicon Foundry

PowerAmerica is repurposing a former six-inch silicon foundry to manufacture wide bandgap power electronics devices. Establishing a PowerAmerica process based on university research is critical to lowering the entry barrier in this highly specialized field. Today Xfab is running devices in its foundry from four other PowerAmerica members in its facilities. These companies are collaborating to create new opportunities for business. Much work remains before us, but the ground work has inspired participation in this new venture from within and outside of the Institute.

Building a Pipeline of Future Power Engineers

The success of the National Manufacturing Institutes depends on manufacturing becoming a highly desirable job for the workforce of the future. PowerAmerica started that process its first year by engaging 225 freshman engineering students at North Carolina State University in their introduction to engineering course to the next generation of Power Electronics. Building a pipeline of talent excited about future manufacturing sets in motion our pathway to tomorrow. The demands for power includes all disciplines of engineering and matches the interests of young people in building a sustainable future through renewable and efficient energy sources.

PowerAmerica Partners with Lockheed Martin: U.S manufacturer will assist institute in developing power-efficient microelectronic devices.

PowerAmerica, the Next Generation Power Electronics Manufacturing Innovation Institute, and Lockheed Martin are partnering to develop a new generation of power-efficient microelectronic devices that will reduce energy loss across the power grid and enhance the performance of future aerospace systems.

http://on.mktw.net/1Dn3ljB

PowerAmerica Announces New Funding for Wide Bandgap Development

PowerAmerica, a private-public partnership between the U.S. Department of Energy, industry and academia, has released a new call for projects to advance wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductor manufacturing and to accelerate the adoption of WBG semiconductor power electronics applications.

Issued October 2nd, the call for projects requests participation on:

  • Projects that lower the cost and increase the availability of wide bandgap power electronic devices by increasing gallium nitride (GaN) and silicon carbide (SiC) foundry capacity.
  • Projects that advance innovative WBG semiconductor devices from design through qualification and accelerate the pathway for devices to reach volume manufacturing.
  • Projects that increase the acceptance and adoption of WBG power electronics by advanced packaging and demonstrating reliability of SiC and GaN devices.
  • Projects to accelerate commercialization of WBG power electronics applications in:
    • Transportation and energy constrained mobile systems.
    • Renewable energy power conversion and energy exploration
    • Energy efficiency for communications and digital systems
    • High voltage systems and energy efficient motor drives.
  • Education and workforce development for WBG semiconductors and power electronics.

Details and a schedule can be found at http://www.poweramericainstitute.org/call-for-projects/. Technical applications require 1:1 cost sharing.

“The advantages of WBG are tremendous,” said John Muth, Deputy Director of PowerAmerica. “Compared to silicon, in many applications using WBG power electronics the system can be reduced in size and weight, operate at higher temperatures and cut energy losses in half. This is a great opportunity for U.S. industry to excel and compete with the rest of the world and is a fantastic area for young engineers to further their careers.”

About PowerAmerica

PowerAmerica is a private-public partnership between the U.S. Department of Energy, industry and academia. Members include a growing number of leading U.S. companies, academic institutions, and government laboratories.

Led by North Carolina State University and located on Centennial Campus, the mission of PowerAmerica is to develop advanced manufacturing processes to enable cost-competitive, large-scale production of wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductor-based power electronics, which allow electronic systems to be smaller, faster and more efficient than power electronics made from silicon. PowerAmerica is a $146 million program, with $70 million provided by the U.S. Department of Energy and $76 million provided by industry, state and academia through cost sharing. www.poweramericainstitute.org

About NC State University

NC State University is a public, coeducational research university located in Raleigh, North Carolina. With more than 34,000 undergraduate and graduate students, NC State is the largest university in North Carolina and surrounding states. It is also a leader in attracting sponsored research, including being the only university in the U.S. leading two National Science Foundation Engineering Research Centers – the FREEDM and ASSIST Centers. NC State is also home to Centennial Campus, a 1,213-acre research campus that houses 70 corporate, governmental and non-profit partners and numerous academic programs, including the College of Engineering, College of Textiles, and the College of Veterinary Medicine. www.ncsu.edu.

For more information:
Meg Chester
Business Services Coordinator
(919) 513-1391
Meg_Chester@ncsu.edu